Laotian Langur (Trachypithecus laotum)


MORPHOLOGY:
This species has a sacculated stomach to assist in the breakdown of cellulose. The Laotian langur has enlarged salivary glands to assist it in breaking down food. This species has slim hands and feet and reduced thumbs. The dental formula of the Laotian langur is 2:1:2:3 on both the upper and lower jaws (Ankel-Simons, 2000). The overall pelage coloration is black with having a broad, white forehead band (Groves, 2001). Around the mouth and on the chin and throat, pale hairs are present (Groves, 2001). From the mouth to the ears on both sides of the face, white hairs can be found (Groves, 2001). The tail may have yellow hairs at the tip (Groves, 2001). Females have a small orange-yellow patch of hair over the pubic area, which consists of spottily depigmented skin (Groves, 2001).

RANGE:
The Laotian langur is found in the country of Laos (Le and Campbell, 1993/1994; Ruggeri and Timmins, 1995/1996; Groves, 2001). This species has been found in the Nam Kading and Khammouane National Biodiversity Conservation Areas in Laos (Groves, 2001).

ECOLOGY:
The Laotian langur is a folivorous species. This is an arboreal and diurnal species.

LOCOMOTION:
The Laotian langur moves through the forest quadrupedally (Fleagle, 1988).

SOCIAL BEHAVIOR:
The Laotian langur has a unimale social system.

VOCAL COMMUNICATION:

OLFACTORY COMMUNICATION:

VISUAL COMMUNICATION:

TACTILE COMMUNICATION:
social grooming: This is when one individual grooms another and is used to reinforce the bonds between individuals.

REPRODUCTION:
The Laotian langur gives birth to a single offspring.

REFERENCES:
Ankel-Simons, F. 2000. Primate Anatomy. Academic Press: San Diego.

Fleagle, J. G. 1988. Primate Adaptation and Evolution. Academic Press: New York.

Groves, C.P. 2001. Primate Taxonomy. Smithsonian Institute Press: Washington, D.C.

Le, X.C. and Campbell, B. 1993/1994. Population status of Trachypithecus francoisi poliocephalus in Cat Ba National Park. Asian Primates. Vol. 3(3/4), 16-20.

Ruggeri, N. and Timmins, R.J. 1995/1996. An initial summary of diurnal primate status in Laos. Asian Primates. Vol. 5(3/4), 1-3.

Last Updated: June 20, 2007.
[The Primata] [Primate Evolution] [Primate Taxonomy] [Primate Conservation] [Primate Fact Sheets] [Primate Definitions] [Primate Store] [Trachypithecus Links]