Sangihe Island Tarsier (Tarsius sangirensis)


MORPHOLOGY:
This nocturnal species has large eyes and large ears that are mobile. The Sangihe island tarsier has a special adaptation in its neck vertebrae to help it turn its head 180 degrees. It needs to do this because its eyes can not move. The dental formula of this species is 2:1:3:3 on the upper jaw and 1:1:3:3 on the lower jaw (Nowak, 1999). This species has relatively small upper canines (Nowak, 1999). This species lacks a tapetum lucidum found in most nocturnal animals. The Sangihe island tarsier has two grooming claws on each foot instead of just one. This species has fur on both the tarsus and end of the tail that is shorter and less than that found on Tarsius spectrum (Shekelle et al., 1997). This species was found to be significantly heavier than members of the genus Tarsius from Sulawesi (Shekelle et al., 1997).

RANGE:
The Sangihe Island tarsier is found on Greater Sangihe Island which located about 200 kilometers north of the island of Sulawesi (Shekelle et al., 1997).

ECOLOGY:
This species is a carnivorous species. Sangihe island tarsiers sleep in dispersed groups, and sleep on exposed stalks of bamboo, on the tops of palm fronds, and in the tops of trees (Shekelle et al., 1997).

LOCOMOTION:
This species is a vertical clinger and leaper.

SOCIAL BEHAVIOR:

VOCAL COMMUNICATION:

OLFACTORY COMMUNICATION:

VISUAL COMMUNICATION:


TACTILE COMMUNICATION:

REPRODUCTION:

REFERENCES:
Nowak, R.M. 1999. Walker's Primates of the World. The Johns Hopkins University Press: Baltimore.

Shekelle, M., Leksono, S.M., Ichwan, L.L.S., and Masala, Y. 1997. The natural history of the tarsiers of north and central Sulawesi. Sulawesi Primate Newsletter. Vol. 4, 4-11.

Last Updated: April 17, 2007.
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